PASS Pro Memberships for deserving people

I just bought seven PASS Pro Memberships, and will give most of them away.

I will be inviting my community (starting with the Adelaide Data & Analytics User Group that I run, but open to everyone) to nominate anyone they feel should benefit by my giving them a year of PASS Pro Membership. You can't nominate yourself – I want you to think of people who have been made redundant recently, or who generally have a harder time in life than others. Lots of people have lots of struggles, and if you know someone, then I invite you to nominate them. Do that by emailing me at "rob at lobsterpot.com.au" and making case for them. I have to get you to make a case for them, because I don't know how many nominations I will get, and I can't afford to buy one for everyone. I will choose who gets them, and it will be completely subjective – I have no idea what criteria I will use to select the people yet.

There will be no strings attached in either direction on these giveaways. If someone is unable to receive one because they are a government employee or whatever, then it's up to them to turn it down. If there are taxes or something owed because of it, then that's also on the recipient. Also, PASS have their own terms and conditions on having a PASS Pro Membership, which the recipient would need to agree to, and they will need to become a PASS member (the free level) before they can receive it.

The idea for this came from a conversation I was in with some people who were looking into giving away a ticket to this year's PASS Virtual Summit to someone in their community. I mentioned that my preferred way of finding a deserving person is via a nomination process. And I figured that as I would normally be sponsoring my local group by buying pizza for the attendees, I could spend the money in a different way, and direct it to people who need it, rather than just people who want pizza. And I think the PASS Pro Membership is at a level where I can give to more people.

So have a think, and email me about people, telling me why they should get one. Maybe put "PASS Pro Membership nomination" and the person's name in the subject line, so that I can spot them more easily.

@rob_farley

SQL Community time capsule

Tamera Clark (@tameraclark) is hosting T-SQL Tuesday this month (thanks!), and wants us to nominate something to put into a SQLCommunity time capsule. She says "What do you want others to know about the #SQLCommunity and #SQLFamily? What do you want the finders of this time capsule to know about our current goings-on? What would you like the finder to know about you, how would you like to be remembered? Even if it's a piece of rockin' code that you think should live on forever, include it."

I had to think about this one. As much as I like the double OUTER APPLY (SELECT TOP (1)…) thing that I do, especially for protecting my base tables in warehouse loads, I'm not about to suggest that it would be worthy of a time capsule. However, when I think about the general SQLCommunity side of things, my mind goes to conferences and the things that go on there.

I've been speaking at conferences overseas for over ten years, and at conferences within Australia even longer. The learning that goes on there is fun, but people also make an effort to let their individuality shine through. I think of the costume parties at SQLBits (officially starting with the Robin Hood theme at Nottingham, although there were Viking hats at York – the photo below was taken by Martin Bell, and managed to capture the fact that I was keeping a doughnut for later), and the community area at PASS Summit, where people have been known to dress up in various things.

I haven't been to too many costume parties at SQL events. The only SQLBits event I've been to since the themes really kicked in was the Magic one, and I learned a few tricks, rather than coming in a costume. That was fun. I suspect there should be something relating to costumes in a SQLCommunity time caspule.

But one thing that I often think about regarding PASS Summit is the ribbons. I had never seen conference ribbons before 2010 and my first PASS Summit, when I was given ribbons to indicate that I was an MVP, a Chapter Leader, a Speaker, and a FirstTimer. I don't remember if there were others, but my mind immediately wondered why people didn't just bring their own.

So I did.

The next year, I got a whole bunch of custom ones of mine own. Not to give away, just to wear. They were mostly red to go with my company branding, and I wrote anything I could think of on them. PASS gave me seven to wear that year, because I was on the PASS Board, delivering a precon, and was an author on the MVP Deep Dives book, but I added a bunch new ones each day of the conference. By the Friday it was down to my knees, and it was becoming hard to keep it from breaking. I only have a picture from early on though.

The idea seemed to catch on and by the following year lots of people brought their own, including plenty to give away. Nowadays it's quite common for people to have a whole range of different ribbons attached to their conference badges, but I only wear the official ones. I figure it was my thing in 2011, and now my thing is to not have custom ones.

People (and sponsors) do a great job with what they put on the custom ribbons they make, and I think they've really become part of the culture of the PASS Summit. I see people collecting as many as they possibly can, and the creativity around them is terrific. I hear people saying "Ooh, where did you get that one from?", which is a great conversation ice-breaker in itself.

So I think my nomination for inclusion in the SQLCommunity time capsule is a collection of creative conference ribbons. I wouldn't be able to provide it, but I'm sure there are people who have kept them over the years.

@rob_farley

Not speaking, but still supporting PASS Summit

First up – I'm not speaking at the PASS Summit this year. The virtual one in 2020. But I've registered and will attend, because the PASS Summit is still worthwhile.

I had made a big deal about submitting – I wrote a long thread about it on Twitter. I put three sessions in and hoped to be selected. But I wasn't and that's fine. That's not what this post is about.

Those of you who know me well might know that I'm not even someone who typically enjoys attending sessions at a conference. It's not my preferred way of learning, and even just sitting in a conference theatre chair for a long time gets to me and makes the learning experience hard. If I'm attending your session, I'm doing it because I'm interested in you more than in your content. For me, attending a conference is about what happens outside the sessions, not inside.

So if I'm not interested in the content of the event, and I'm not speaking, and I don't get to see people in person, what's the appeal of the PASS Summit this year? Why should I register and attend? Why should you?

And the answer is the same as if it was a real one – for the community and the networking.

PASS has always been about the community and providing ways for people to Connect, not just to Share or to Learn. "Connect, Share, Learn" has been a PASS motto for ages, but I think sometimes people see PASS as being all about the content, when it's really about the connection.

Many conferences are all about the content, and that's fair enough when you consider that it's usually employers that pay for people to attend these events. Attendees are often told to bring back knowledge, and maybe even give presentations to colleagues about what they've learned.

And yet for the PASS Summit, I'm not sure that content is the main draw.

I don't think content is what it was. When I first attended a large technical conference, which would've been TechEd Australia 1999, I was getting content that I couldn't really get anywhere else. A colleague and I flew from Melbourne to Brisbane, and we split the sessions we wanted to attend so that we got good coverage of the content. The parties were fun, and there was plenty of swag to be had from sponsors, but I didn't try to build a network at all.

By the time I got back to TechEd Australia it was 2005 and I had been actively involved in my user groups for a while. I spent time meeting people, especially presenters and other influencers, and got a sense of where things were moving. Instead of trying to catch a glimpse of what was going past, I tried to get caught up in the stream. By the time TechEd 2006 had come around, I had made a few trips to Redmond, I was involved in the hands-on labs, and my career was different.

The content from TechEd Australia 2006 was mostly already available through blog posts, articles, and videos from other events. But the networking was something I couldn't get in the same way.

PASS makes no bones about the fact about the networking side. They promote the "SQLFamily" concept enthusiastically. They provide activities to help first-time attendees get to know people. The content is still important, but the focus is on community. It is a community-focused organisation, after all.

This is what makes this year's PASS Summit tricky. Content-wise, people can get a lot of similar content from elsewhere. The sessions themselves are unique, but I'm sure that many sessions will have significant overlap with other sessions that have been given elsewhere. It's simply how presentations work. But without people gathering in person, that networking side will be hard. What will make the PASS Summit different this year, and different to most other online events, is that they are pushing to find ways to let people interact with each other despite the online-only format. You might not be able to physically walk up to a presenter at the end of their session, but they will still be available for questions, conversations, all that. With a wider reach possible because of the online approach, allowing networking between people in different parts of the world, it could be very significant.

Besides the presenters, many people who aren't presenting this year (myself included) will be hanging around. Time zones might make this trickier for some, considering that daytime in America is night-time where I am, but I'm typically jet-lagged at these things anyway. I'm hoping to be able to hang out in virtual rooms to see some of the old faces, meet new people, and be part of discussions. Most of the learning we do in life is through conversations not conventions, and I don't want that to stop just because we can't meet in person.

So I've registered as an attendee for the Virtual PASS Summit 2020. Hopefully I'll get to see you there.

@rob_farley